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JEREMY WILLIAMS: "THEY NEED TO CREATE A SUPER HEAVYWEIGHT DIVISION"

By Nick Sanchez | August 11, 2009
JEREMY WILLIAMS:

"I think now there is a scarce array of talent in the heavyweight division. These Europeans, these Eastern Block guys, they have really dominated. There really hasn't been an American in a while. We definately need an American champion in that respect...the heavyweight division needs to be broken up into two halves with one being above 240 and the other below 240 or maybe even 230 because you have guys cutting down from 260 to 240, you know? People are just getting bigger and the heavyweight division, well, let's see, if we look at the smaller weight classes, it's like 119, 122, 125, 130, 135, etc. and the heavyweight division is 200 to too many. It doesn't make a difference. You can weigh whatever. I mean 7', 300 lbs. and he can fight a guy that is 6', 200 lbs. I mean, people are just getting bigger. I think boxing needs to expand the heavyweight division. They need to create a Super Heavyweight division," stated former heavyweight contender Jeremy Williams as he shared his thoughts on the current state of the heavyweight division. Check it out!

NS: Jeremy, how have you been?
 
JW: Good man. Just relaxing in my life.
 
NS: Man, you've accomplished so much in your career. I don't even know where to start. How about Bully Beatdown. How is that project coming along?
 
JW: Sure man, Bully Beatdown should be starting filming in another week or so. Jason [Mayhem Miller] is cool to work with. From there, I've got my t-shirt line coming out and I am also working on a instructional Boxing and MMA stand-up DVD for Ringside magazine.
 
NS: How has your experience been with your TV projects? You've got Bully Beatdown now and you were also a coach on The Contender.
 
JW: Bully Beatdown has done a really, really good job and is a great show. It is done by the same people as The contender; that's actually how I got the job. You know, Bully Beatdown is for a diffenent audience. It's for a younger crowd. It's an MTV show. It's more fun than to find a great fighter.
 
NS: What are some of the wierdest things you have seen on the set of Bully Beatdown? I mean, I saw one episode where the bully guy just completey blew chunks in the cage. That was nasty (laughing).

 
JW: Maaaan, it just blows my mind because when I was growing up, bullies were like, violent; definately a lot tougher than the guys that are on the show.
 
NS: I hear ya man. We are about the same age so I know what you're talking about.
 
JW: On one show, the taping guy walked in and said, "Here comes the bully." I was looking past him and he goes, "That's him!"  I was like, "Him? He's a bully?" If he's a bully, I wonder who the heck is a real bully, you know (laughing)?
 
NS: I hear ya man. On a more serious note, you're fighting career, where do you stand as far as your MMA career or your boxing career? Do yo have any plans on fighting soon?
 
JW: I think my better fighting days are behind me, but my coaching and inspiring days are in front of me. You remember? Like back in the day, Richard Simmons...damn this will tell you about my age...you remember when he was like "The Man" for workouts? That was more like the beginning; not as much as now, but he just inpired people. He just knew how to inspire people to be better and feel better about themselves, you know? Strength and all the other workouts that he did, it was more to just inspire the people and I think, well, that's the field that I want to get into. I want to get into self-help and motivation. Right now, I am developing a concept called Reaction Fitness, which is kind of a self-defense exercise.
 
NS: Nice. I will make sure to keep an eye out for your DVD. Jeremy, now going back to your boxing days in the heavyweight division, you were a part of probably what was the last batch of exciting American fighters. There was you, Tyson, Holyfield, Ike Ibeabuchi, Bowe, and the foreign guys like David Tua from New Zealand and of course Lennox Lewis was coming up then too. What is your take on where the heavyweight division stands in boxing today compared to back then?
 
JW: Well, I think now there is a scarce array of talent in the heavyweight division. These Europeans, these Eastern Block guys, they have really dominated. There really hasn't been an American in a while. We definately need an American champion in that respect. Michael King, the guy that I am training all my heavyweights for, he is looking for that guy. 6'4", 240 and above; that's his parameters. We are looking for for that next great American heavyweight champion. I also believe, in my opinion, that the heavyweight division needs to be broken up into two halves with one being above 240 and the other below 240 or maybe even 230 because you have guys cutting down from 260 to 240, you know? People are just getting bigger and the heavyweight division, well, let's see, if we look at the smaller weight classes, it's like 119, 122, 125, 130, 135, etc. and the heavyweight division is 200 to too many. It doesn't make a difference. You can weigh whatever. I mean 7', 300 lbs. and he can fight a guy that is 6', 200 lbs. I mean, people are just getting bigger. I think boxing needs to expand the heavyweight division. They need to create a Super Heavyweight division. That would be much more fair to the athletes that are big, but not huge.
 
NS: Yeah, they do it in amateur boxing. They do it for that reason. Why wouldn't it work in the pros?
 
JW: You know? And in MMA, it's shown that there needs to be a top and a bottom for the weight. 205 is light heavyweight and 206 to 265 is a heavyweight and that's it.
 
NS: you bring up a good point and I was going to ask you this a little later, but since we are talking about weight classes, I thought I'd ask you now. Recently, Wanderlei Silva fought Rich Franklin at 195 lbs. Do you think that 195 should be another weight division? I mean, from middleweight at 185 to light heavy at 205, that is a huge difference. That 20 lbs., in my opinion, is too much of a gap.

JW: It's a huge difference. I mean, I was that guy that was caught in the middle between the 186 light heavweight division and the 200 lbs. heavyweight division. I mean, being a light heavyweight all my life, I was tired of cutting weight.
 
NS: Speaking of a small heavyweight versus a big heavyweight, we have David Haye, former undisputed cruiserweight champ, fighting the much naturally bigger man Nikolai Valuev. How do you think that fight might pan out or a fight with one of the Klitschkos?
 
JW: David Haye is a good stand-up boxer. Ultimately, I dont think he is going to be able to deal with a guy like Vitali and his power. I mean, Klitschko is a well-schooled, well-versed athlete. It is gonna be hard for Haye to beat him; not to mention the cockiness and the arrogance they have in the ring, it's gonna be a hard fight for Haye.
 
NS: Now going back to your boxing career, I was a huge fan of yours. You always brought it; you were exciting. We miss fighters like you man.
 
JW: Hey, thank you man. Well, you know, it's very strange because I am popular for a guy who, in my own opinion, really didn't do much. I have a lot of fans.
 
NS: You sure do man.
 
JW: And I appreciate it so much man.
 
NS: Jeremy, is there one moment in your boxing, mma or coaching career that really stands out in your mind? Maybe a moment you are most proud of?
 
JW: I think when I hit the world record for fastest knockout, that was pretty cool.
 
NS: Wasn't that on Tuesday Night Fights on USA? I totally remember that.
 
JW: Yeah, I believe it was Tuesday Night Fights. Then also, when I submitted a guy for the first time, triangle, armbar, I can't remember, some shit like that (laughing).
 
NS: Thanks a lot for your time Jeremy.

JW: Not a problem. Any time man.

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